How vitamin D protects against colon cancer and diabetes

It has been a year since the news broke that Victor Dog Food in California had been found to be the culprit in the massive, nationwide epidemic of colon cancer.

The company was accused of manufacturing a high-protein dog food that contained excessive amounts of vitamins D, E, and K. At the time, no evidence had been presented that dogs were more susceptible to colon cancer than humans.

But that wasn’t the end of it.

The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times published articles detailing a disturbing number of health and safety violations at Victor Dog Foods, including a series of high-profile recalls.

The paper reported that Victor had been accused of using a “slush diet” that contained a “high percentage” of vitamin D3, a compound that is not naturally found in humans, and was found to have contaminated the urine of at least some of the dogs.

The Los Angeles Daily News also reported that at least one dog was given the toxic cocktail before it was removed from the market.

While Victor has denied all the allegations, the company has been forced to pay $3.5 million in fines for the violations.

While the company is currently appealing the fine, its CEO, Tom Koehler, said in a recent interview with the New York Post that the company was taking the long-term effects of the company’s actions seriously.

“The bottom line is, we took a lot of time to do this, and I think people have the right to know the truth,” he said.

“We’re going to continue to do everything we can to address these issues in a transparent manner.”

In an exclusive interview with ABC News, Victor Dog Owner Tom Kuehler said that the corporation has “reached out to consumers” to inform them of the recall.

The dog food has since been withdrawn from shelves.

“Victor Dog Food is committed to serving our customers the highest quality food that they deserve,” Kuehlman said.

In his recent statement to ABC News: “We are taking this matter very seriously and will continue to provide updates to the public on the details of this matter.”

However, Kuellers spokesperson, Kristina Zwilling, told ABC News that Victor has not been “in compliance with any federal, state, or local food safety regulations, and we have not taken corrective action to address any of these violations.”

In a statement to the Los Angles Times, Koehlman told the paper: “Victorian has made substantial changes to the formula that were not approved by the FDA.

He added that Victor was “actively working to improve our quality control and ensure the continued availability of our product, which is a testament to our commitment to the quality of our dog food.” “

All of our ingredients are USDA Certified Organic and are fully compliant with all Food Safety and Inspection Act requirements, including the Safe Ingredient Management Act (SIMEA).”

He added that Victor was “actively working to improve our quality control and ensure the continued availability of our product, which is a testament to our commitment to the quality of our dog food.”

As for the company and the subsequent recall, Victor said in an emailed statement: “All dogs are tested daily, including those on the recall list, and every dog is provided with a clean, free of any contaminants, fresh water bottle and nutrition label.

Victor will continue working diligently to address the issues identified by the federal government in order to provide the highest possible quality and safety to our customers and to ensure that Victor continues to serve our customers with the highest-quality dog food in the industry.” “

To ensure that the public is not misled, we will be sharing information with our consumers in the coming days, so they are aware of any changes in the ingredients, and the nutrition label information.

Victor will continue working diligently to address the issues identified by the federal government in order to provide the highest possible quality and safety to our customers and to ensure that Victor continues to serve our customers with the highest-quality dog food in the industry.”

This article originally appeared on Business Insider.